Winners 2014 Categories

overall-winner-small

Newham All Star Sports Academy

Using basketball to keep kids safe

 

Overall-Winner-NASSA

NASSA was founded after a mother took her two boys to a local park for an impromptu  basketball coaching session in Newham, East London – one of London’s most deprived boroughs.  Before long, 30 youngsters aged eight to 20 had joined in, and NASSA was born to provide these young people to meet and have fun in a safe environment.

In 2008, two friends of one of NASSA’s players were killed in a knife attack and the charity launched an initiative called ‘Carry a Basketball, Not a Blade’ (CABNAB).  Through CABNAB, NASSA wanted to  improve young people’s  basketball skills and educate them about the dangers of knife crime and gang culture.

In order to achieve these, the older youths were invited to become coaches and NASSA enrolled them on accredited training courses to gain basketball coaching qualifications. The charity offered extra-curricular basketball training sessions to pupils as a local school in return for use of its gym as a training court, and NASSA coaches delivered training and tournaments along with talks and Q&As about knife crime and mentoring at every session.

Within weeks 16 other schools in Newham asked NASSA to provide sessions for them.

A code of behaviour was established and sessions were scheduled for times that kids often turn to crime or anti-social behaviour.  When parents attending games became abusive to game officials, the children drew up a code of conduct for parents.

Before long the charity decided to increase the scale of the schools sessions and spread to neighbouring boroughs. It now runs coaching and mentoring sessions for nearly 2,000 children at 65 primary schools every week, as well as 25 older teens at four colleges across east London.

NASSA is certain that its work has contributed in a significant way to the 46 per cent reduction in serious youth violence and gang-related crime in Newham last year. And its junior, senior, men’s and women’s teams won 14 National League titles during the season.

Charity Awards judge Sir Christopher Kelly described NASSA as  “a really energetic organisation doing substantial things to help the local community”.

www.nassasports.org.uk

 

outstanding-achievement

Michael Norton

Michael Norton

The ideas merchant

The Charity Awards judges selected Michael Norton to receive the Outstanding Achievement Award in 2014. Tania Mason met the man whose fingerprints are all over civil society.

If you’ve spent any time at all in the voluntary sector over the last 40-odd years, chances are you’ve come across Michael Norton – or at least his work.  Even those that don’t know Michael, or are not familiar with his name, are likely to have trodden a path that he has helped to carve.  His fingerprints are everywhere; in fundraising training, in youth empowerment, in women’s rights, in social franchising, in crowdfunding, in social enterprise – the list goes on.  The deeper you delve into his expansive career, the more you realise just how ubiquitous and influential Norton has been.

Many will know him as the founder and first director of the Directory of Social Change; others as the driving force behind UnLtd, the foundation for social entrepreneurs that won a £100m endowment from the Millennium Commission.  Others still will align him with Changemakers, or YouthBank; many more will have read one of his numerous books on fundraising or social change – 365 Ways to Change the World or The Complete Fundraising Handbook, perhaps.

It’s a journey that started after university, Norton recalls, when his father asked him if he was going to volunteer. “I almost didn’t even know what he was talking about, so illiterate was I about social action and social change,” he confesses. “But for an easy life I said ‘why not’.”

This took him to the local Jewish youth centre where he set up an old people’s visiting programme.  One evening, he says, two 14-year-old girls came to the centre full of smiles because they had taken an old lady out for a walk – the first time she had left her flat in three years.  “They said ‘we borrowed a wheelbarrow, put some cushions in it, carried her down the stairs and took her for a walk to the shops’.  I was really impressed by that, by the fact you could just do something to make such a difference to people’s lives.  All these health and social care workers couldn’t think to do that, yet these two young girls just had the idea and did it.”  That firmly planted the seed in his mind that it was entirely possible just to do your own thing and put ideas into action.

A couple of years later, in 1966, this seed germinated and flourished into his first venture. He’d been thinking a lot about doing something around immigration and tackling racism, and then someone said to him ‘you can’t just go around doing good, you have to have a skill to do good with’.  So he decided to use his English language skills to set up the UK’s first language-teaching programme for immigrant children and their families.

“In those days there was no child or data protection, so I would go to schools and ask for a list of families who have just arrived and don’t speak English.  And then I would go to groups of young adults, mostly in their 20s, and say ‘would you like to volunteer, I’ve got something really interesting to do’ and I would send them along to give an English lesson.  They didn’t know anything about teaching or education, they just did it.  It was entirely voluntary – we had no name, no organisational structure, no bank account, no money – just a card index.

“It worked really well. In two years I had 250 volunteers, from accomplished actresses to out-of-work students.

“And actually, like a lot of projects, what you do is not always what you think you are doing – looking back what we were really doing was providing a bridge of friendship rather than English, because they would have absorbed English anyway.”

Career change

This experience gave Norton the confidence and the certainty that he was destined for a career in social action, and before long he had quit his merchant banking job and ploughed full steam ahead into the voluntary sector.  At the start he found himself helping lots of organisations to fundraise, and counts the establishment of Women’s Aid among his most cherished successes.  “Erin Pizzey and I had a lot of fun, I learned a lot from her about user involvement and the like.  She set it up, I helped her get the money for it and find her base in Chiswick, and I helped her with legal issues.  I edited a book called Battered Women and The Law which advised women how to get an injunction to protect themselves from their violent husbands.”

But he was itching to set up his own organisation and an idea was bubbling away in his mind.

“It was a time when social change was becoming really interesting. In the 1970s there was a Home Office Urban Programme which put money into all sorts of new interesting things, so suddenly the voluntary sector was full of people doing stuff around rape crisis, work with single parents, all sorts of things that had not been done before.  I wanted to create a database of issues, organisations, information, case studies, and what you could do if you wanted to do something about it. I called that the Directory of Social Change.”

But none of his funding applications to trusts and foundations bore fruit, so in the end he went down the publishing route and secured a generous book contract.  He envisaged a series of ten directories, on subjects like housing, women’s issues, community, health, science and so on – but the publisher went broke after the first four, potentially stymieing the venture.

Just then, Norton met his wife, Hilary Blume (now Dame), who had just written “the first nice book on fundraising” – Fund-raising: A Comprehensive Handbook.  Together they decided to organise a series of conferences at which to launch the book, and the proceeds from these events provided sufficient revenue to set up the DSC.

The organisation grew to become one of the sector’s biggest training providers, as well as publisher of hundreds of books including guides to company giving and major trusts.

Youth participation

After 20 years at DSC Norton fancied a new challenge and was approached by some people who had won £25,000 from the Sainsbury’s Trust to set up a youth action programme based on the idea that young people themselves should be deciding what they want to do.  “So I joined this group, we called it Changemakers, and it was the first organisation to put young people at the centre so that we weren’t doing things for them, they were doing things for themselves.”

From Changemakers emerged YouthBank, from YouthBank grew the Street Children’s Bank in India, and then MyBnk in the UK.  “All these ventures were the progression of one idea of young people doing things,” says Norton. “That idea didn’t come from the youth sector.  Youth workers would talk about it in general terms but they never did it.  They still remained dominant in what happened – they would say ‘let’s have a football club’, not ‘what do you want to do after school?’  So we influenced the whole sector on how they engaged with young people.

“One of the things YouthBank did was a consultancy for the National Lottery on how to distribute money for young people.  Today everybody making grants to young people will take advice from young people.”  Last year the first YouthBank International conference in Berlin was attended by YouthBanks from 16 countries.

Another major achievement was assembling the consortium which became the successful bidder for the £100m Millennium Legacy to create an endowment for making awards to individuals. This led to the creation of UnLtd, which makes over 1,000 awards each year to people with ideas for changing their community, society or the world.

Pinpointing brilliant people

Nowadays Norton remains involved in a whole raft of initiatives but has changed the way he works.

“I now do things when I find brilliant people.  I still have the brilliant ideas but these days I’m a bit lazier so I look for people and they always seem to appear.”  One such idea was charity franchising, which he first cottoned onto as long ago as 1993, while at DSC.  “I’d noticed that organisations which had adopted the right growth strategy were growing faster than those just wanting to grow. Crossroads Care and HomeStart were two examples of thriving, new organisations, whereas old organisations like Old People’s Welfare, were stagnating a bit.”  But despite getting a grant for some feasibility studies, a manual and some events, it didn’t really go anywhere; Norton reckons it was ahead of its time.  Then a couple of years ago he met Clore Social Fellow Dan Berelowitz, who was comparing McDonald’s and FoodBank for his research project.  Within ten minutes of them talking, says Norton, Dan had decided to quit his job and pursue the idea.  A year or so later the International Centre of Social Franchising was launched, offering consultancy to charities on how to grow, particularly internationally. It now has seven staff, is fully self-sustaining and operates in six countries. Norton remains a board member.

He also remains chairman of Buzzbnk, the crowdfunding website he launched in 2011.

A few years back Norton set up the Centre for Innovation in Voluntary Action (Civa) as an umbrella for all his work: “Civa is my desk, my briefcase, my computer.”  He has one associate who also uses the Civa brand umbrella and hopes to attract one or two more.

It’s patently clear that Norton has no intention of hanging up his boots any time soon. “I’ll go on as long as I go on,” he shrugs.  “It’s fun.  Sometimes an idea doesn’t work, sometimes it works really well, sometimes you think it’s not working but it is.  Sometimes you make bad decisions – usually when you hand it over to a big organisation.  I’m very happy being where I am, a centre from where ideas and energy radiate, rather than having a big organisation.”

Norton’s vast experience in the sector has convinced him that there is greater value to be had from investing in individuals rather than organisations, but he accepts that is an argument yet to be won.

“People find it harder to identify and support individuals.  It’s riskier but the dividends are much greater.  Big organisations get very complacent and bureaucratic – the vibrancy comes from small organisations and then big organisations follow.”

Pipeline of  future ventures

And if by some freak chance you’ve not yet happened upon any of Michael Norton’s projects, there remains every chance that you will.  He’s presently working on a host of new ideas.  Make a Difference (Mad) TV is a magazine programme about communities, involving celebrities, poets, rappers and potentially the Eden Project: “not as serious as Secret Millionaire, more fun”.  Best Foot Forward is a training programme where unemployed people shine shoes to raise money for charity – the House of Common and Goldman Sachs are already on board to host shoe-shine days.  Carwash for Charity is a similar concept.

He’s also trying to generate support to set up a national centre for enlightened agriculture in the West Midlands, and his SmallWorks scheme creating workspaces on housing estates where early-stage social entrepreneurs can engage with the local community, continues to expand.

“In the last 20 years I’ve moved from this idea of working with big organisations to help them work more effectively by understanding the law, management, communication, fundraising, which was what DSC was about, to engaging with individuals and their ideas to make them happen.

“It’s extraordinary how many people have great ideas and are trying to do things. With a little support and business modelling we can create a sector which is vibrant, uses modern technology, and is much more self-sustaining than the traditional charity market.  It’s not an either/or, charities have a role too.  But you get something like social investment tax relief and the mainstream charity sector is dead against it because it doesn’t suit their paradigm, but this new emerging sector of social enterprise and social investment will give us a chance to generate more resources and develop more creative relationships with supporters.

“Part of change is what you do and part of it is changing the landscape so other people do things differently.”

The Norton years

1966:  Established UK’s first immigrant language-teaching programme

1975 – 1995: Founder and director, Directory of Social Change

1994 – 2001: Founder and Executive Chair, Changemakers Foundation

1995 – now:  Founder and honorary director, Centre for Innovation in Voluntary Action

1998 – 2003: Founder, YouthBank UK

1998:  Awarded an OBE for services to the voluntary sector

1998 – 2003: Worked with ChildLine India to franchise the a telephone helpline service for street children across India and launched Child Helpline International in 2003

2001 – 2010: Co-founder and Board Member, UnLtd

2001:  Chair, International Year of the Volunteer Youth Programme

2003: In partnership with Butterflies, created a network of Children’s Development Banks in South Asia

2011 – now: Adjunct Professor at the Graduate School of Business, University of Cape Town

2011 – now: Philanthropy Instructor, Beijing Normal University

2011 – now: Founder and chair, Buzzbnk

2012 – now:  Founder and trustee, International Centre for Social Franchising

advice-support-advocacy

St Giles Trust

Breaking the cycle of gang violence

Advice-Suport-&-Advocacy-St-GilesSt Giles Trust works with serving prisoners and ex-offenders to help break the cycle of offending by putting trained ex-offenders at the heart of services.  Its SOS project helps young people in London caught up in serious youth violence, typically through involvement in gangs.

It was borne out of the firsthand experiences of former inmate Junior Smart who observed that the same young men frequently returned to prison despite leaving with good intentions.  Junior was already working to support fellow inmates and believed that reformed ex-offenders with previous gang involvement could be used to help young men stay straight. Having heard of St Giles Trust in prison, Junior approached it on his release in 2006.

In eight years SOS has expanded from one project in Southwark to integrated projects across 11 London boroughs.  Around 730 high-profile, prolific young offenders have been supported. An external evaluation has found that 87 per cent felt engaging with the project had changed their attitude to offending, while 73 per cent said it was important that their caseworkers were ex-offenders themselves, as they could relate to and be inspired by them.

The cost/benefit savings are also impressive.  The average annual cost of a prison place for a young offender is around £90,000, while one SOS caseworker supporting up to 40 clients costs around £2,000 per client.

One client said that if it wasn’t for their caseworker they’d be in jail while another commented: “They actually get results – no-one else does that for you.”

www.stgilestrust.org.uk

arts-culture-heritage

Spitalfields Music

Staging opera for children under two

Arts-Culture-&-Heritage-Spitalfields-MusicAs part of a drive to bring live arts to disadvantaged children, Spitalfields Music launched Musical Rumpus, a series of interactive opera performances for children under two in the London Boroughs of Tower Hamlets, Newham and Barking & Dagenham.

The project was born out of previous research which showed that exposure to live arts supported very young children’s cognitive and social growth, and also encouraged parents to engage with the arts. The project was also designed to help reinforce the use of English for children for whom it was a second language, and prepared them for the transition to school.

The charity felt that early-years children in the boroughs had previously lacked arts activities, particularly music, and that its own experience qualified it to meet this need. It also hoped to develop a blueprint for other arts charities to replicate in other deprived areas.

Spitalfields developed an existing piece of opera and worked with a specialist musician to rearrange the music for the age group. It incorporated suitable set design and free play sessions as part of the experience. Performances were an hour long and provided for up to 30 children.

The performance went out in a local arts venue in Tower Hamlets and 12 children’s centres and libraries in Newham and Barking & Dagenham. It was attended by 900 babies and toddlers, mostly from poor backgrounds.

www.spitalfieldsmusic.org.uk

children

Newham All Star Sports Academy

Using basketball to keep kids safe

Children-&-Youth-NASSANASSA was founded after a mother took her two boys to a local park for an impromptu  basketball coaching session in Newham, East London – one of London’s most deprived boroughs.  Before long, 30 youngsters aged eight to 20 had joined in, and NASSA was born to provide these young people to meet and have fun in a safe environment.

In 2008, two friends of one of NASSA’s players were killed in a knife attack and the charity launched an initiative called ‘Carry a Basketball, Not a Blade’ (CABNAB).  Through CABNAB, NASSA wanted to  improve young people’s  basketball skills and educate them about the dangers of knife crime and gang culture.

In order to achieve these, the older youths were invited to become coaches and NASSA enrolled them on accredited training courses to gain basketball coaching qualifications. The charity offered extra-curricular basketball training sessions to pupils as a local school in return for use of its gym as a training court, and NASSA coaches delivered training and tournaments along with talks and Q&As about knife crime and mentoring at every session.

Within weeks 16 other schools in Newham asked NASSA to provide sessions for them.

A code of behaviour was established and sessions were scheduled for times that kids often turn to crime or anti-social behaviour.  When parents attending games became abusive to game officials, the children drew up a code of conduct for parents.

Before long the charity decided to increase the scale of the schools sessions and spread to neighbouring boroughs. It now runs coaching and mentoring sessions for nearly 2,000 children at 65 primary schools every week, as well as 25 older teens at four colleges across east London.

NASSA is certain that its work has contributed in a significant way to the 46 per cent reduction in serious youth violence and gang-related crime in Newham last year. And its junior, senior, men’s and women’s teams won 14 National League titles during the season.

Charity Awards judge Sir Christopher Kelly described NASSA as  “a really energetic organisation doing substantial things to help the local community”.

www.nassasports.org.uk

disability

SignHealth

Providing specialist domestic violence support to deaf women

Disability-SignHealthSignHealth’s DeafHope and Young DeafHope are the UK’s first and only specialist domestic violence support service for deaf women and young people.  The charity had known for some time that there was a domestic abuse problem within the deaf community because cases referred to its own psychological therapy service reported high rates of domestic violence – twice the rate for the general population, in fact.

Yet there was virtually no service provision for deaf women and children. Mainstream services generally failed to understand their linguistic and cultural needs and often made the victims’ situations worse, for instance by using the hearing perpetrator to ‘interpret’ for the deaf woman he/she is abusing.

In 2010 SignHealth recruited Lynn Shannon, a professional with expertise in both deaf issues and domestic violence, as the first and only deaf independent domestic violence advocate. Shannon devised an action plan comprising both emergency support for victims and preventative work in schools and youth clubs. She secured funding from a variety of sources, recruited and trained a specialist team of female British Sign Language users to deliver the services, and forged strong links with refuges, local authorities, deaf clubs and Women’s Aid.

DeafHope launched in 2012. Cases proved much more complex than anticipated, with most women affected not born in Britain, including refugees or asylum-seekers, and requiring highly intensive support.  Therefore targets needed to be changed, explained to funders, and staff had to retrain in International Sign Language. Interventions uncovered many cases of honour-based violence, forced marriage and female genital mutilation.  Because the deaf community is so small and close-knit, painstaking measures had to be taken to ensure the personal safety of service users and staff.

The impact of delivering Young DeafHope in deaf schools was immediate. One school, which originally believed there were no cases of abuse among pupils, was shocked to find that eight out of its 34 students disclosed incidents of abuse or victimisation.

Future plans include a deaf-accessible helpline, family intervention and work with deaf male perpetrators.

www.signhealth.org.uk

education-and-training

United Response

Improving access to news for people with learning disabilities

Education-&-Training-United-ResponseOne of United Response’s most passionate beliefs is that people with learning disabilities should be equal participants in society. However, it had previously discovered that far fewer vote in elections than the general population.

While the charity’s Every Vote Counts campaign succeeded in persuading the main political parties to produce easy-read manifestos, it realised that an accessible source of news was needed all the time for these votes to be meaningful. A baseline survey revealed that just 11 per cent of the charity’s clients regularly read a newspaper and that they did not generally feel informed about current affairs.

A lightbulb moment came in 2011 when disability activist Kaliya Franklin quizzed Ed Miliband at the Labour party conference and asked United Response to create an accessible news report about it. This was made available through social media and Kaliya and United Response began planning a regular accessible newspaper, Easy News. Funding was secured from the Big Lottery Fund for a six-edition pilot.

Easy News exceeded United Response’s expectations with 90 per cent of respondents to a survey saying it was easier to understand than other news sources while 78 per cent felt that politics was now relevant to their lives, compared to 31 per cent a year before.  By the sixth edition, 3,272 people had downloaded it – 250 per cent over target.

Additionally Easy News created work for more than 30 people with learning disabilities, while anecdotal feedback included one mother saying that a story about Winterbourne View “promoted a bit of a discussion with my son; a rare occurrence as he is not very talkative”.

This year, Easy News is being funded out of the charity’s legacy funds while a sustainable funding model is devised – probably involving advertising.

Charity Awards judge Danielle Walker Palmour said: “Easy News is a new thing in the world and it is rare to see something genuinely new.”  Richard Hawkes described it as a “really good concept”.

www.unitedresponse.org.uk

environment-conservation

Plymouth Marine Laboratory

Improving marine observation in Africa

Environment-&-Conservation-PMLIn order to ensure a sustainable ocean for future generations, it is necessary to monitor and understand what is happening to this vast resource.  However, after many years of working in the international arena, it was evident to Plymouth Marine Laboratory (PML) that monitoring around the African coast was not as advanced as in other areas of the world.  Furthermore, the skills within many African nations to undertake marine research were limited.

The Europe-Africa Marine Earth Observation Network (EAMNet) is a collaborative project linking Earth observation information providers, user networks and centres of excellence in Europe and Africa in the area of coastal and marine observations. It aims to provide African nations with the resources they need to manage their environment more effectively and ensure long-term sustainable development in the region, to help in the alleviation of poverty.

As well as improving marine data provision for African countries, EAMNet has resulted in improved interaction between African and European information providers, user networks and centres of excellence, collaborations which are likely to continue into the future.

A key success has been to create a network of African and European scientists that provides a focus for marine and coastal activities and enables African scientists to engage in strategic policy development.

It has also provided fellowship opportunities for 28 early career professionals to develop their expertise by working alongside experienced researchers.

Charity Awards judge John Low described it as “important work”; Danielle Walker Palmer said it was an entry that had “global strategic impact”.

www.pml.ac.uk

grantmaking

The Nationwide Foundation

Tackling financial abuse among the socially isolated

Grantmaking-&-Funding-Nationwide-FoundationThe Nationwide Foundation acted on research that revealed older people and survivors of domestic abuse were among the most in need of help with housing and financial issues.

In response it launched the Money Matters, Homes Matter, Families Matter grantmaking strategy in 2009, supporting nine charities with grants of £300,000 over three years.

As a result of the programme, which ended in 2013, the finances of beneficiaries were collectively improved by £3m through better access to welfare benefits, grants and debt reductions. Some 6,000 older people and survivors of domestic violence were given financial advice and support, and housing advice was delivered to 1,200 people.

Research commissioned by the charity found that among victims of domestic abuse, financial abuse was a persistent problem, which often caused victims to remain with their abusers. Researchers also found that older people, who were either living in isolated rural communities, had dementia or were from black and ethnic minority communities, were similarly vulnerable to becoming victims of financial abuse.

Through the programme Age UK supported 813 older people, mainly from Somali and Bangladeshi communities, with its funding and increased the money going to beneficiaries in benefits and grants by £369,203. Money Advice Plus Services & Women’s Aid increased the income of its beneficiaries by £1.5m and reduced their debt by £1.6m.

Of the nine charities to win funding, selected from 300 expressions of interest after a rigorous application process, all remain operating, despite significant funding cuts, and six have secured ongoing funding for the same projects.

Charity Awards judge Martin Brookes described the entry as a “model of good thoughtful grantmaking”. He said the Foundation was “not just writing cheques, but providing much more that that” and that its application “ticks a lot of boxes”.

www.nationwidefoundation.org.uk

healthcare

Clic Sargent Cancer Care for Children

Providing community-based support to young cancer patients

Healthcare-&-Medical-research-CLIC-SargentClic Sargent, the cancer charity for young people and their families, has piloted a young people’s community worker service to provide practical and emotional support to young people who receive treatment in adult cancer wards.

From research the charity undertook with 130 16 to 24-year-olds, it concluded that young people with cancer don’t have enough support to deal with issues such as interruption to education and employment, financial hardship and social isolation.

Clic Sargent developed a service model which created the new role of young people’s community worker, as well as improving information and advice available online.

The new role was piloted from 2011 to 2013 in five locations across the UK. In this time, the community workers supported 220 young people during and after their cancer treatment. They were trained using Clic Sargent’s outcome measurement tool the ‘Rickter scale’, which identified how challenges adversely affect different aspects of the young people’s lives.

When the young people were asked to rate the impact of their community worker on different areas of their lives, 90 per cent said that they were their go-to person to discuss feelings, challenges and issues.

Three-quarters of young people said that their community worker had made a significant difference in their confidence to manage their life and to maintaining their friendships and social life.

Charity Awards judge Colin Nee said it was a “strong, well-argued application” and Su Sayer added that it was “well planned and evaluated”.

www.clicsargent.org.uk

aid-and-development

AMAR International Charitable Foundation

Developing respect and awareness of human rights in Iraqi prisons

International-Aid-&-Dev-AMARThe prison system was an aspect of the Iraqi state that had not been reformed since Saddam Hussein’s era. Prisoners were held in poor physical conditions and often subjected to threats, violence and torture. Mechanisms for complaints remained weak and prisons were purely focused on punishment. Many prisoners, on release, lacked support and turned back to crime.

In January 2010 AMAR started a three-year programme funded by the US State Department, to address this. It provided human rights training to more than 700 Iraqi prison guards and simultaneously educated nearly 1,900 prisoners about their human rights. Inmates also received numeracy and literacy training. The cost of the training amounted to around £165 per direct beneficiary.

As a result of AMAR’s work 86.1 per cent of prisoners in prisons supported by the charity said there has been a positive change in the behaviour of guards.

Prisoners also developed a greater understanding of human rights. When ask to list three human rights 43.4 per cent who received training were able to do so, compared to 14.9 per cent of an untrained group.

The project has precipitated a deeper shift in attitudes too – prisons are continuing to run literacy and numeracy classes independently and are organising and funding vocational skill classes for prisons where AMAR worked – as prisoners requested.

This represents a shift from a purely punitive approach to incarceration to a more rehabilitative model, which AMAR hopes will spread to other areas of Iraq.

socialcare-welfare

Alzheimer’s & Dementia Support Services

Implementing a dementia buddy scheme in hospital

 

Social-Care-&-Welfare-ADSSThrough the Dementia Buddy Scheme Alzheimer’s & Dementia Support Services (ADSS) recruits, trains and manages volunteers to assist patients and ward staff during a stay in hospital.

The charity piloted the project at Darent Valley Hospital with funding from Kent County Council in 2012/13 and the framework that was developed by the original three partners can now be replicated in any hospital.

Volunteers engage patients in activities such as reading, dancing, singing, walking, chatting and playing board games. This helps to reduce patients’ agitation and challenging behaviour and improves the atmosphere on the ward. The average length of stay on wards during the pilot was reduced by two days from 30 to 28 days.

Following the successful pilot, funding was secured from the Dementia Challenge Fund so that the project could be rolled out across all acute hospitals in Kent. The charity has also been commissioned to deliver the project by Medway Maritime Trust and Maidstone & Tunbridge Wells Trust.

Alzheimer’s & Dementia Support Services plans to make a blueprint for the Dementia Buddy Scheme available for others to download from the internet, as well as adding a number of support packages for a fee which will generate income for the charity.

Charity Awards judge Sir Christopher Kelly applauded the “simplicity” of the concept which tackled a “very real issue” and said it was “properly evaluated and capable of being rolled out by others”.

http://alz-dem.org/

Awards partners